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  Nitto Noodle Handlebar

(stem and hand not included)


 



$73.00
Made in: Japan


Availability: all in stock
product code: HB1


  

Qty:  
Description
 
The drop bar that riders who already like drops will go nuts over, and the one that'll win over riders who think drop bars are uncomfortable, or something. In all likelihood the Noodle Bar will be the most comfortable drop bar you'll ever set grubby paws on. The top flat portion sweeps back toward you slightly, bringing the bar closer, and the drops (lower portion) flare out four degrees.

But the main thing is the ramp the portion of the bar immediately behind where the brake lever fits. The ramp matters because you put your hands there a lot, and if it's too steep, the support isn't there and your hands slide forward and down. On most bars the ramp is about 24-to-32-degrees, but on the Noodle Bar, it's a much flatter 15 degrees. When you tilt the bar back properly, so that the ends point downward about 10-degrees, that already flattish 15-degree ramp becomes 5-degrees, so even if your hands are slathered in butter, they won't slide down off of that.

This has become our most popular drop bar, and some folks grumble that now they have to get one on all of their bikes. If you're debating between two sizes, consider that a wider bar offers more leverage, so you can more easily hold the bike as your legs (which are much stronger than your arms) push on the pedals and tilt the bike. We don't go along with the idea of getting handlebars as wide as your shoulders. Most people do better with wider bars.

THE PHOTO SHOWS A GOOD WAY TO SET UP THE NOODLE (or any other) HANDLEBAR. Rotate them up to flatten the ramp, set the end of the brake lever a bit higher than the bottom of the bar, and you're all set.

All of our drop bars are measured the same way: Center of the curve to center of the curve. The normal way is center of the end to center of the end. We measure center of the curve to center of the curve because our drops have a slight flare below the curve, and measuring the ends would give a false impression of the width you'd actually feel. It's not complicated: If you're a small woman, order a 41; medium woman or small guy, get a 44; average guy, get the 46; big strong guy, the 48.

26.0mm clamp, 95mm reach, 140mm drop.  Stem not included.

The prices for the 46cm and 48cm are higher than the 41cm and 44cm since it costs extra to make the wider ones stronger (heat treated).
Requires brake levers with a 23.8mm brake clamp diameter.

Nitto calls this bar Model 177.


Average Customer Review: 5 of 5 | Total Reviews: 5   Write a review.

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Comfort and power at any speed September 17, 2014
Reviewer: Paul from CA, United States  
The thing I like most about the Noodle bar is that I can set up the bar position in such a way that I have a comfortable hand position regardless of the intensity of my riding. With other handlebars (without flat ramps) I was either too stretched out when riding lightly or too cramped when hammering as my torso naturally wants to change angle based on effort. This bar is perfect when creeping along a 10-12 mph on flat ground in the tops (the curve fits the palms perfectly) to sprinting in the drops (I have no problems with forearm clearance; bar tops at saddle height) and everything in between. The long flat ramps provide a continuously variable reach between the tops and hoods to accommodate different torso angles and current Campagnolo brake/shifters create a perfectly flat transition between ramps and hoods which suits me. I only wish that the light Soba Bar version was still available for my Roadeo.

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  3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
 
Noodle Handlebar April 29, 2014
Reviewer: JAMES BROWN from NC United States  
This bar is marketed as great for touring. I installed it on a road race bike. It's by far the most comfortable bar I've ever used in 35 years of riding / racing. With the top set flat to the hoods, there is still a substantial drop section in perfect position. I have 98% eliminated pain in my hands since installing the Nitto Noodle 42cm handlebar. The slight back sweep is perfect for top grip climbing too.

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  3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
 
?? January 10, 2014
Reviewer: John-David Torian from Austin, TX United States  
I let my Riv Bike wish list be known this Christmas, and I was not disappointed. I replaced the stock bars on my Salsa Cassserol with the Noodle.

#1, they look good. Don't kid yourself. This is the most important thing. Something about them sloping off the stem.

Feel-wise, I had no idea a good bar could make so much of a difference. The entire bar is an upgrade. It's not this or that.

Order it.

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  3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
 
Al-Dente goodness February 13, 2012
Reviewer: Steven F from Chicago, IL United States  
Yep.  These are great bars.  More swoopy than a traditional drop, making everything a bit more "ergo" or whatever.  Unbeatable finish & quality, as with all Nitto stuff.

I've had two of these, the 44 and the 48.  I'm a normal/tall sized adult male, but the 48 just felt too wide for me.  They also seemed to flex a little bit, which was nice sometimes if you hit some bumpy patches.  The 44 feels more 'right,' but obviously this is personal preference.  Get 'em up high enough to enjoy the drop position.

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  4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
 
Best Upgrade for Commuterizing a Mountain Bike October 5, 2011
Reviewer: Harold S. from Alexandria, VA  
I've spent a good chunk of money upgrading an old (1993) Giant Rincon frame I found to a commuter bike.

Of all the upgrades I've done over the past year (wheels, crank-set, bags, tires), upgrading to the Noodle drop bars  were the most significant in improving my daily ride.

With my prior experience being solely straight mountain style bars, it took a solid two weeks to feel really comfortable with them.

That said, the invested effort and cost was well worth it. The variety of hand positions keeps the longer rides much more comfortable and lets me adapt much better to the type of riding i'm doing.

Just be advised if upgrading a mountain bike of all the associated costs beyond bars and stem (brake lever replacement, shifter replacement, and likely replacing the cables while you're at it). Not a cheap upgrade, but made the most difference to my overall ride enjoyment.

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